The 2013 version of this database presents a time series recording 1° latitude by 1° longitude CO2 emissions in units of million metric tons of carbon per year from anthropogenic sources for 1751-2010. Detailed geographic information on CO2 emissions can be critical in understanding the pattern of the atmospheric and biospheric response to these emissions. Global, regional, and national annual estimates for 1751 through 2010 were published earlier (Boden et al. 2013). Those national, annual CO2 emission estimates were based on statistics about fossil-fuel burning, cement manufacturing and gas flaring in oil fields as well as energy production, consumption, and trade data, using the methods of Marland and Rotty (1984). The national annual estimates were combined with gridded 1° data on political units and 1984 human populations to create the new gridded CO2 emission time series. The same population distribution was used for each of the years as proxy for the emission distribution within each country. The implied assumption for that procedure was that per capita energy use and fuel mixes are uniform over a political unit. The consequence of this first-order procedure is that the spatial changes observed over time are solely due to changes in national energy consumption and nation-based fuel mix. Increases in fossil-fuel CO2 emissions over time are apparent for most areas.

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Detailed geographic information on CO2 emissions can be critical in understanding the pattern of the atmospheric and biospheric response to these emissions. This visualization shows annual CO2 emission estimates that are based on statistics about fossil-fuel burning, cement manufacturing and gas flaring in oil fields as well as energy production, consumption, and trade data. Shown is a time series recording 1° latitude by 1° longitude CO2 emissions in units of million metric tons of carbon per year from anthropogenic sources for 1751-2006.

Visualization Technique: Time is initially accelerated until the onset of the industrial revolution. The date is represented by the first animated yellow arrow.
The data has been interpolated onto a fine grid and displaced along the z-axis. This displacement is capped at 5 million metric tons of carbon. The actual values often exceed the 5 million metric tons but this is not shown in either the displacement or the color plot on the displacement. However, the capped displacement allows the viewer to more easily recognize patterns, such as the rapidly falling values in Europe during World War II.
The subwindow in the lower right corner shows the plot of the actual value distribution. These vales are plotted against 0 as the minimum (black) and the yearly maximum (white). The maximum value for the year is demonstrated by the second animated yellow arrow. This subwindow gives additional information that is not available on the capped displacement, such as where the maximum vales are occuring occurring and phenomenon such as the sudden spike in values in the Persian Gulf as a result of the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait in 1991.
Visualization Credit: Jamison Daniel, Tom Boden, and Bob Andres (Principal Investigator)
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