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Walker Branch Throughfall Displacement Experiment Data Report: Site Characterization, System Performance, Weather, Species Composition, and Growth (NDP-078A)

DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/vrc.ndp078

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Contributed by

Paul J. Hanson1
Donald E. Todd1
Jeffery S. Riggs2
Mark E. Wolfe3
Elizabeth G. O'Neill1

1Environmental Sciences Division
Oak Ridge National Laboratory

2Instrumentation and Controls Division
Oak Ridge National Laboratory

3Tennessee Valley Authority
Norris, Tennessee

Prepared by Robert M. Cushman
Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center
Environmental Sciences Division
Date Published: July 2001

Prepared for the
Environmental Sciences Division
Office of Biological and Environmental Research
Budget Activity Number KP 12 04 01 0

Prepared by the
Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center
OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY
Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6290
managed by
University of Tennessee-Battelle, LLC
for the
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY
under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725

Contents

List Of Tables
Abbreviations
Abstract
Background Information
Introduction
Measurement Methods
Applications of the Data
Data Limitations and Restrictions
Quality-Assurance Checks and Data-Processing Activities Performed by CDIAC
References
Listing of Files Provided
Description of the Documentation File
Description, Format, and Partial Listings of the ASCII Data Files
SAS and Fortran Codes to Access the Data
Appendix A: Reprints of Pertinent Literature
Appendix B: Physical and Chemical Characteristics of the Soils of the Walker Branch Throughfall Displacement Experiment Site
Appendix C: Species Names and Species Codes (Variable Spc in the Data Files) of the Walker Branch Throughfall Displacement Experiment Site
Appendix D: Listing of Throughfall Displacement Experiment Publications

List of Tables

  1. Environmental sensors attached to the TDE ambient plot CR10X data logger as of December 2000
  2. Files in this numeric data package
  3. Contents and format of sw.dat (File 4)
  4. Contents and format of nine.dat (File 5)
  5. Contents and format of tdr.dat (File 6)
  6. Contents and format of rocks.dat (File 7)
  7. Contents and format of littert.dat (File 8)
  8. Contents and format of st9398.dat (File 9)
  9. Contents and format of st9900.dat (File 10)
  10. Contents and format of mweather.dat (File 11)
  11. Contents and format of dweather.dat (File 12)
  12. Contents and format of hw9399.dat (File 13) and hw00.dat (File 14)
  13. Contents and format of comptree.dat (File 15)
  14. Contents and format of compsap.dat (File 16)
  15. Contents and format of atree.dat (File 17)
  16. Contents and format of asapling.dat (File 18)
  17. Contents and format of rellai.dat (File 19)

Abbreviations

CDIAC = Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center
CEC = cation exchange capacity
CLR = canopy light ratio
dbh = diameter at breast height
FTP = file transfer protocol
LAI = leaf area index
NDP = numeric data package
PAR = photosynthetically active radiation
QA = quality assurance
RelLAI = relative leaf area index
TDE = Throughfall Displacement Experiment
TDR = time-domain reflectometer
WBW = Walker Branch Watershed

Abstract

Hanson, P. J., D. E. Todd, J. S. Riggs, M. E. Wolfe, and E. G. O'Neill. 2001. Walker Branch Throughfall Displacement Experiment Data Report: Site Characterization, System Performance, Weather, Species Composition, and Growth. ORNL/CDIAC-134, NDP-078A. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. doi: 10.3334/CDIAC/vrc.ndp078

This numeric data package provides data sets, and accompanying documentation, on site characterization, system performance, weather, species composition, and growth for the Throughfall Displacement Experiment, which was established in the Walker Branch Watershed of East Tennessee to provide data on the responses of forests to altered precipitation regimes. The specific data sets include soil water content and potential, coarse fraction of the soil profile, litter layer temperature, soil temperature, monthly weather, daily weather, hourly weather, species composition of trees and saplings, mature tree and sapling annual growth, and relative leaf area index.

Fortran and SASTM access codes are provided to read the ASCII data files. The data files and this documentation are available without charge on a variety of media and via the Internet from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC).

Keywords: forests, growth, leaf area index, litter, sapling, soil, soil temperature, soil water content, soil water potential, tree, weather

Background Information

Introduction

Models of global climate change predict that increasing levels of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will (1) cause an increase in average global temperatures and (2) alter regional levels of precipitation. It is also predicted that the incidence of drought will increase with a warming global climate. Forests throughout the southeastern United States, where evapotranspiration demand is high and is predicted to increase as temperatures rise, would be particularly vulnerable to declines in annual precipitation. Potential responses of U.S. forests to future drought associated with climate change include a reduction in net primary production and stand water use, along with increased mortality of seedlings and saplings (Hanson and Weltzin 2000).

To provide data on the responses of forests to altered precipitation regimes, the Throughfall Displacement Experiment (TDE) was established in the Walker Branch Watershed (WBW) of East Tennessee (latitude 35o 58' N, longitude 84o 17' W). Funding for the TDE was provided by the Program for Ecosystem Research of the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research.

Remotely sensed imagery of the WBW is available from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (http://modis- land.gsfc.nasa.gov/val/coresite.asp?SiteID=28 and http: //modis.gsfc.nasa.gov/MODIS/LAND/VAL/prove/forest/prove.html) and from the U.S. Geological Survey.

A detailed description of the TDE is provided by Hanson et al. (1998) and Hanson et al. (2001) (see Appendix A). Experimental manipulation of hydrologic inputs at the TDE is accomplished by intercepting throughfall in approximately 2000 subcanopy troughs (0.3 × 5 m) suspended above the forest floor on a "dry" treatment plot and transferring the throughfall across a control plot for distribution onto a "wet" treatment plot. Each plot is 80 × 80 m in size. The treatments result in a 33% decrease in precipitation reaching the forest floor on the dry plot and a corresponding increase in precipitation on the wet plot. Reductions in soil moisture on the dry plot are expected to be equivalent to the driest growing seasons of the 1980's drought, which resulted in reduced tree growth of some species.

The site was chosen because of its uniform slope, consistent soils, and a reasonably uniform distribution of vegetation. The physical and chemical characteristics of the typic Paleudult soils (Fullerton cherty silt loam) of the TDE site are summarized in Appendix B. The forest community is dominated by white oak, chestnut oak, and red maple, but it contains more than 25 tree species (Appendix C). The past 25 years of research on the Walker Branch Watershed provide an important reference database against which to judge the outcomes of this large-scale field experiment.

Measurement Methods

Soil Water Content and Potential

Soil water content (%, v/v) was measured with a Soil Moisture Equipment Corp.« TRASE SYSTEM time-domain reflectometer (TDR) following the procedure of Topp and Davis (1985) as documented for soils with high coarse-fraction content (Drungil et al. 1989). Three hundred and ten sampling locations were installed at an 8 × 8-m spacing across the site, giving more than 100 soil water monitoring locations per plot. At each location two pairs of TDR waveguides were installed in a vertical orientation (0 to 0.35 and 0 to 0.7 m). The surface (0 to 0.35 m) TDR measurements coincide with the zone of maxium root density in these soils. TDR measurements were obtained biweekly during the growing season and approximately monthly during the dormant season. The TDR soil water content measurements were adjusted for the coarse fraction of these soils and converted to soil water potentials using laboratory-derived soil moisture retention curves for the A, A/E, and E/B horizons (Hanson et al. 1998).

Soil Rock Content

Soil was sampled from depths of 0 to 30 and 30 to 60 cm in ~10-cm-diameter cylindrical cores with a total volume of 2430.96 cm3. The soil coarse fraction was determined by weighing the material retained by a 2-mm sieve. To convert coarse-fraction mass to volume all rock (i.e., chert) was assumed to have a mean density of 2.3 g cm-3. This density was based on laboratory observations for chert taken from the TDE samples.

Weather and Radiation

Weather data are collected as hourly means and logged on LiCor« LI-1000 data loggers housed in instrument enclosures located at one upslope and one downslope location per treatment plot and one enclosure in the nearby clearing. Measurements of incoming rainfall, irradiance (LiCor« LI-200SA pyranometer), and photosynthetic photon flux density (LiCor« LI-191SA quantum sensor) were obtained in a nearby clearing until 1998 when above-canopy observations were added to the ambient plot tower. Clearing data were used to represent "above-canopy" conditions for the experimental site for the years 1993-1997. Mean incident shortwave radiation was measured with an Eppley« precision spectral pyranometer located 44 m above the forest canopy (these data are not available for 1993 and 1994). Two tipping bucket rain gauges with 3-m extension troughs attached are installed on each plot to evaluate the amount of throughfall reaching the forest floor. Sub-canopy air temperatures (2 stations per treatment plot) are measured with thermistors at approximately 1 m height in a location shielded from direct solar radiation. Wind data for 1993 through 1997 are from a height of 37 m on the the Oak Ridge Ameriflux tower (10 m above the canopy). A value of 1.5 m s-1 is used to fill in for missing hours for those years in the hourly weather data. Wind data for 1998 through 2000 are from the ambient plot tower on the TDE experimental site and the anemometer is nearer to the canopy (4 m above the canopy).

Litter Temperature

Self-contained Onset Computer« data loggers were deployed within the Oi litter layer during extensive periods in 1997 1998 and 2000. In 1997 1998, StowAway XTI08 sensors in the dry (x4) and ambient (x4) plots were used. The XTI08 sensors employed an external thermistor positioned inside litter decomposition bags that were located in the Oi horizon leaf litter from March 15, 1997, through February 6, 1998. StowAway TidbiT sensors were placed directly in the Oi layer of the dry (x4) and wet (x4) plots from January 27, 2000, to December 14, 2000. Soil Temperature From 1993 through 1997 hourly soil temperatures were measured at two depths (10 and 35 cm) at 2 locations in each treatment plot. LiCor« LI-1000-15 soil temperature thermistors were installed vertically from the surface to the specified depth. Data were automatically logged on six independent LiCor LI-1000 data loggers housed in instrument enclosures located at one upslope and one downslope location per treatment plot. No differences among treatment plots or slope positions were observed for temperatures at these depths, and the data were pooled as hourly site averages. Starting in 1998, soil temperature observations were obtained from Campbell Scientific« Model 107 soil temperature thermistors installed horizontally into the walls of an excavated and subsequently refilled soil pit. The probes were distributed at four depths in each pit (~10 cm, ~30 cm, ~45 cm, and one deep probe in the 60 to 100-cm range). Data were logged as hourly means of 5-second (for 1993-1997 data) or 1-minute (1998 and thereafter) observations on a Campbell Scientific« CR10X data logger.

Tree Mortality and Growth

Prior to the experiment and at approximately annual intervals thereafter, all trees greater than 0.1 m in diameter at 1.3 m height (diameter at breast height, dbh) were identified to species (762 trees). Presence/mortality was recorded annually. Annual diameter measurements were conducted with diameter tapes at tagged locations on all trees.

Tree heights and crown widths were measured directly on approximately one- third of the trees or derived from allometric relationships from a subset of the measured data. Quercus spp. and Acer spp. were the major canopy dominants; Liriodendron tulipifera L. was a canopy dominant on the lower slope positions; and Nyssa sylvatica Marsh. and Oxydendrum arboreum [L. ] D. C. were the predominant species occupying mid-canopy locations. In March of 1994, stand basal area averaged 21 m2 ha-1 with nearly identical basal area on each plot. By December 1999, mean basal area across all plots had increased to 22.8 m2 ha-1.

Quercus alba L., Q. prinus L., Acer rubrum L., L. tulipifera L., and N. sylvatica Marsh. trees greater than 0.2 m dbh were fitted with dendrometer bands (170 trees) for biweekly measurements of stem circumference during each growing season. A single dendrometer measurement consists of duplicate digital caliper measurements (0.01 mm resolution) of the distance between two reference holes in stainless steel dendrometer bands (25.4 mm wide × 0.2 mm thick) installed around the circumference of each tree (McLaughlin and Downing 1996). Measured changes in the circumference of each tree were combined with information on its initial stem diameter to obtain the change in stem basal area over time (mm2 day-1 or mm2 year-1). Dendrometer bands were installed on the Q. alba, Q. prinus, and A. rubrum trees prior to the 1993 growing season, and bands for L. tulipifera and N. sylvatica were added in February of 1994. All dendrometer bands were installed during the dormant season, ahead of the initial growth measurements, to eliminate potential first-year bias in the dendrometer band measurements (Keeland and Sharitz 1993).

Sapling Growth and Mortality

Starting in 1996 all saplings in 27 plots (8 × 8 m) distributed across the TDE experimental area (9 plots per treatment) were observed for survival and diameter (measured with a caliper) at marked locations on the stems. The preferred target height for diameter measurements was 1.3 m unless the sapling was too small, in which case 1 m was used instead. Figure 1 shows the distribution (random within rows). Each small block is an 8 × 8-m plot. The 27 plots, each 8 × 8 m, yielded a total of 1728 m2 of monitored area, which was 9% of the total TDE experimental area. The number of saplings (trees < 0.1 m dbh) across the TDE area averaged 3073 ha-1 in 1994 and 2112 ha-1 in 1999. Saplings contributed an additional 3 and 2.6 m2 ha-1 to total stand basal area in 1994 and 1999, respectively. Acer rubrum L. and Cornus florida L. combined to make up 59 percent of all saplings and 53 percent of the sapling basal area.

In February and March of 1994, 10 transects for observations of sapling growth and mortality were established across the three plots from lower- to upper-slope positions. Although other species were considered for these measurements, only A. rubrum and C. florida were distributed across the TDE in sufficient numbers for inclusion. Saplings ranged from 10 to 60 mm dbh with the majority from 10 to 40 mm. Height measurements were not included because the crowns were broad without predominant main shoots and because height growth was minimal in the low-light understory environment of our closed canopy stand. Starting at the time of spring leafout each year, biweekly measurements of stem diameter at a permanently marked location on each sapling's main stem (typically between 1 and 1.5 m above the ground) were conducted until sapling growth had ceased for that year. Each stem caliper measurement was the mean of three replicate diameter measurements made with a digital caliper (0.01 mm resolution) from three different angles around the marked point of measurement. The mean of replicate measures from different angles was required to minimize the impact of noncircular stem cross sections. Sapling stem diameters were converted to basal area to express mean daily sapling growth rates per plant in mm2 day-1, or integrated annual sapling growth in mm2 year-1. Incremental growth of saplings that died in a given year were included in the calculation of that year's mean growth rate but excluded in all subsequent estimates of annual growth. Additional randomly chosen saplings were added to the measurement pool after the 1994, 1995, and 1996 growing seasons (to make up for mortality losses), but no additional plants were added to this observation set after that time.

Leaf Area Index

Seasonal patterns of stand leaf area development were determined from the ratio of understory to overstory light penetration. This canopy light ratio (CLR; Equation 1) was calculated as 1 minus the ratio of the daily sum of understory photosynthetically active radiation (PARu; PAR at 1.5 m) to the daily sum of overstory incident PAR (PARo):

CLR = 1-(PARu/PARo)          Eq. 1

Because of the presence of tree boles and branches, pre-leaf out and post- senescence baselines for the CLR were not zero. Therefore, to express the CLR on a 0-1 scale it was necessary to adjust the ratio for the light penetration during leafless periods as shown in Equation 2:

RelLAI = (Observed CLR-baseline)/(Maximum CLR-baseline)          Eq. 2

where RelLAI is the relative leaf area index on the 0-1 scale for a given date. However, because the baseline ratio resulting from the presence of boles and branches changed with solar elevation, we found it necessary to use more than one baseline for the calculation of the seasonal pattern of RelLAI. Although the baseline CLR in the absence of leaves would vary continuously with solar elevation, we found that use of the pre-leafout baseline for days 80 through 180 and the post-senescence baseline for days 181 through 350 yielded an acceptable RelLAI pattern. It is important to note that the RelLAI values are representative of the development of leaf area, not leaf mass (i.e., they may overpredict the rate of annual leaf mass accumulation). Approximations of leaf mass development or a direct estimate of leaf are index (LAI) could also be made from the same data using a light extinction approach as described by Hutchinson and Baldocchi (1989).

Data Logging

Environmental data for the TDE were logged on Campbell Scientific« CR10X data loggers located on each of the treatment plots. All loggers were interfaced with a Campbell Scientific MD9 coaxial multidrop interface, and data from all loggers were remotely accessed weekly via Campbell Scientific« COM200 modem and cellular telephone. As a backup to remote data downloads, the logged data were also stored in Campbell Scientific« SM192 nonvolatile circular memory with the capacity to hold approximately one month's data for the configuration used here. The loggers and associated instrumentation operated off three 12-volt, deep-cycle marine batteries wired in parallel. The batteries were trickle-charged from solar panels (Solarex« 55 watts @ 17.4 volts; with a metered Morningstar« PS30M photovoltaic controller, 30-amp PV current @ 12 volts) installed on towers above the forest canopy. Sensors were connected to the CR10X data logger via a standard wiring panel and two Campbell Scientific« AN416 multiplexer modules.

An example data program for the CR10X data logger editor and the data logger download file for the TDE ambient plot and its instruments are included in this numeric data package (NDP) as files tdeambi.csi and tdeambi.dld, respectively. The example program includes two sampling tables. The majority of the instrumentation is queried once per minute and logged as hourly means or sums as a part of the first sampling table, and a second samling table is included to query heat dissipation matric potential sensors (Campbell Scientific« Model 229) twice a day (noon and midnight). Table 1 lists the measurement interval, logging interval, and type of sensors being logged on the TDE ambient plot as of December 2000.

This NDP provides datasets, and accompanying documentation, on site characterization, system performance, weather, species composition, and growth. Related NDPs are planned on physiology, decomposition, and nutrient cycling.

Applications of the Data

These data are useful for quantifying certain responses of temperate forest ecosystems (litter and soil water content, growth, mortality) to changes in precipitation patterns. Other datasets from the TDE will be useful for quantifying other aspects of ecosystem response (e.g., physiology, decomposition, nutrient cycling).

Data from the TDE have been used in published studies of the effects of altered water regimes on forest root systems (Joslin et al. 2000) and sapling and large-tree growth and mortality (Hanson et al. 2001), and a wide variety of process-based studies (see Appendix D for TDE publications).

Data Limitations and Restrictions

Users should be aware of limitations to the data as a result of suspect values. The quality-assurance checks performed by CDIAC, and the results of those checks, are described in Section 4.

In the weather files, some reported values of relative humidity (in files mweather.dat, dweather.dat, hw9399.dat, and hw00.dat) exceed 100%; this is physically impossible. However, it is not yet known how these values arose nor how to adjust the data.

Some values of relative leaf area (in file rellai.dat) were suspiciously low, such as the value of 0.44 on day 289 in 1998. Most such values occur in the fall; a lower sun angle may contribute to these low values. A curve-fitting approach may be appropriate to analyze the patterns of leaf senescence.

Hourly weather data were checked by the data contributors for errors and missing data. If bad or missing data were found, approximate replacement data were obtained from other weather data sources in the area, if possible, to provide the most complete data set.

If TDE shortwave radiation data are needed for model input, the values for SWISIS should be used instead of the LiCor« pyranometer data. Both are in good agreement for most years, but the TDE pyranometer data for 1998 and 2000 do not agree very well with the SWISIS data (mean of 5 observations) distributed across the reservation.

The issue of pseudo-replication in the experimental design is addressed by Hanson et al. (1998) and Hanson et al. (2001).

In addition to the above considerations, users should be aware that there is some evidence of minor effects of the experimental infrastructure (specifically, the precipitation-collection equipment) on the microclimate of the "dry" treatment plot.

Quality-Assurance Checks and Data-Processing Activities Performed by CDIAC

An important part of the data packaging process at CDIAC involves the quality assurance (QA) of data before distribution. To guarantee data of the highest possible quality, CDIAC performs extensive QA checks, examining the data for completeness, reasonableness, and accuracy.

Comma-delimited files provided by the data contributors were imported into Microsoft Excel« for QA checks (and, ultimately, converted to space-delimited ascii files for archiving). Files were renamed when necessary, for consistency. Variable names were made consistent across files, for simplicity of documentation and analysis.

The file soiltemp.txt provided by the data contributor was divided into two files, st9398.dat (data from 1993 through 1998) and st9900.dat (data from 1999 through 2000). Sixteen tdr*.txt files (one set for each of two depths, 35 and 70 cm, and for each year from 1993 through 2000) were combined into one tdr.dat file. For consistency with other files, in file tdr.dat integer values 1, 2, and 3 for the variable TREAT were replaced by character values W, A, and D, respectively; and values 1, 2, and 3 for the variable SLOPE were replaced by values B, M, and U, respectively. Eight monthly and eight daily weather files (one monthly and one daily file for each year from 1993 through 2000) were combined into a single mweather.dat file and a single dweather.dat file, respectively. Seven hourly weather files (for the years 1993 through 1999) were combined into a single hw9399.dat file.

The format of all values was checked for improper entries.

Several files (e.g., atree.dat) were reformatted by adding variables for year, depth, etc., but eliminating variables that were a combination of year, depth, etc., and another variable (e.g., growth), thereby reducing the total number of variables, resulting in a "narrower" but "longer" file.

For all variables in all files, the range of values was checked for impossible or suspiciously large or small values, such MONTH >12 or values of water potential (e.g., variable A35WP in file sw.dat) >0 MPa. Values of relative humidity apparently exceeding 100% are discussed in Section 3.

Comparisons and X-Y scattergrams were used to check for outliers and impossible or unlikely combinations. For example, file mweather.dat was inspected to ensure that, for air temperature, relative humidity, and soil temperature, the minimum did not exceed the mean, which in turn did not exceed the maximum; no observations failed this test. Scattergrams were plotted and visually examined to check the correlation between PYRAN and QUAN; and ATMIN and STMIN, ATMEAN and STMEAN, and ATMAX and STMAX (minimum, mean, and maximum air and soil temperatures) in file mweather.dat; no obvious outliers were detected.

The following lists the specific data-quality checks by file:

  • File sw.dat
    • range checks for all variables
    • scattergrams: DOY v RDOY, RDOY v DATE
    Result: No suspect data were identified.
  • File nine.dat
    • range checks for all variables
    • scattergrams: DOY v RDOY
    Result: No suspect data were identified.
  • File tdr.dat
    • range checks for all variables
    Result: No suspect data were identified.
  • File rocks.dat
    • range checks for all variables
    Result: No suspect data were identified.
  • File littert.dat
    • range checks for all variables
    • scattergram: FDOY v DOY
    • Result: No suspect data were identified.
    • File st9398.dat and st9900.dat
      • range checks for all variables
      Result: No suspect data were identified.
    • File mweather.dat
      • range checks for all variables
      • comparisons: ATMIN <= ATMEAN <= ATMAX, RHMIN <= RHMEAN <= RHMAX, STMIN <= STMEAN <= STMAX
      • scattergrams: PYRAN v QUAN, ATMIN v STMIN, ATMEAN v STMEAN, ATMAX v STMAX
      Result: No suspect data were identified (other than some values of RHMIN, RHMEAN, and RHMAX >100%).
    • File dweather.dat
      • range checks for all variables
      • comparisons: ATMIN <= ATMEAN <= ATMAX, RHMIN <= RHMEAN <= RHMAX, STMIN <= STMEAN <= STMAX
      • scattergrams: PYRAN v QUAN, RADMEAN v QUAN, ATMIN v STMIN, ATMEAN v STMEAN, ATMAX v STMAX
      Result: No suspect data were identified (other than some values of RHMIN, RHMEAN, and RHMAX >100%).
    • File hw9399.dat
      • range checks for all variables
      • comparisons: UQUAN <= QUAN
      Result: Some values of RH >100%; 1502 occurrences of UQUAN > QUAN were detected (with values of UQUAN minus QUAN ranging from 1 to 366 umol m-2 s-1, typically during periods of low light conditions), tentatively attributed by the data contributor to random error in the sensors or data loggers; these data were not adjusted.
    • File hw00.dat
      • range checks for all variables
      • comparisons: UQUAN <= QUAN
      • scattergrams: PYRAN v QUAN, UQUAN v QUAN, HOY v DFOY, AT v ST
      Result: Some values of RH >100%; 97 occurrences of UQUAN > QUAN were detected (with values of UQUAN minus QUAN ranging from 1 to 6 umol m-2 s-1), as with file hw9399.dat.
    • File comptree.dat
      • range checks for all variables
      • check for duplicate values of ID
      • check SPC values against list of species
      Result: No suspect data were identified.
    • File compsap.dat
      • range checks for all variables
      Result: No suspect data were identified.
    • File atree.dat
      • range checks for all variables
      • check for duplicate values of ID
      • check SPC values against list of species
      Result: No suspect data were identified.
    • File asapling.dat
      • range checks for all variables
      • check for duplicate values of ID
      • check SPC values against list of species
      Result: No suspect data were identified.
    • File rellai.dat
      • range checks for all variables
      • Relative LAI values between 0 and 1
      Result: All years had some values of relative LAI that were outside the range of 0.00 to 1.00 (minimum of -0.33 in 1994 and maximum of 1.05 in 1998); per instruction from the data contributor, these were set to missing. A few anomalously low values, such as 0.44 on day 289 in 1998, were detected; per instruction from the data contributor, these were not changed.

    References

    • Drungil, C. E. C., K. Abt, and T. J. Gish. 1989. Soil moisture determination in gravelly soils with time domain reflectometry. Transactions Am. Soc. Agric. Eng. 32:177-180.
    • Hanson, P. J., D. E. Todd, and J. S. Amthor. 2001. A six-year study of sapling and large-tree growth and mortality responses to natural and induced variability in precipitation and throughfall. Tree Physiology 21:345-358.
    • Hanson, P. J., D. E. Todd, M. A. Huston, J. D. Joslin, J. L. Croker, and R. M. Auge. 1998. Description and field performance of the Walker Branch Throughfall Displacement Experiment: 1993-1996. ORNL/TM-13586. Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee.
    • Hanson, P. J., and J. F. Weltzin. 2000. Drought disturbance from climate change: Response of United States forests. Science of the Total Environment 262:205-220.
    • Hutchinson, B. A., and D. D. Baldocchi. 1989. Forest meteorology, pp. 21-95. In D. W. Johnson and R. I. Van Hook (eds.), Analysis of Biogeochemical Cycling Processes in Walker Branch Watershed, Springer-Verlag, New York.
    • Joslin, J. D., M. H. Wolfe, and P. J. Hanson. 2000. Effects of altered water regimes on forest root systems. New Phytologist 147:117-129.
    • Keeland, B. D., and R. R. Sharitz. 1993. Accuracy of tree growth measurements using dendrometer bands. Canadian Journal of Forestry Research 23:2454-2457.
    • McLaughlin, S. B., and D. J. Downing. 1996. Interactive effects of control ozone and climate measured on growth of mature loblolly pine trees. Canadian Journal of Forestry Research 26:670-681.
    • Topp, G. C., and J. L. Davis. 1985. Measurement of soil water content using time domain reflectometry (TDR): A field evaluation. Soil Science Society of America Journal 49:19-24.

    Description of the Documentation File

    The ndp078a.txt (File 1) file is an ASCII text equivalent of this document.

    Description, Format, and Partial Listings of the ASCII Data Files

    Table 3 describes the format and contents of the ASCII data file sw.dat (File 4) distributed with this numeric data package. The missing-value indicators in this file are -9.9 for variables A35WC, D35WC, W70WC, A70WC, D70WC, W3570WC, A3570WC, and D3570WC; and -9.99 for variables A35WP, D35WP, W3570WP, A3570WP, and D3570WP.

    First two data records:

      January 14, 1993   14  14 25.5 25.4 24.8 -0.04 -0.04 -0.04 26.2 26.6 26.5
    27.7 28.6 29.0 -0.02 -0.02 -0.02
     February 24, 1993   55  55 26.6 25.6 25.1 -0.03 -0.04 -0.04 26.0 25.8 26.4
    26.3 26.8 28.5 -0.03 -0.03 -0.02
    
    

    Last two data records:

      November 1, 2000 2862 306  6.6 -9.9  5.6 -1.83 -9.99 -2.77 -9.9 -9.9 -9.9
    -9.9 -9.9 -9.9 -9.99 -9.99 -9.99
     December 15, 2000 2906 350 23.0 23.4 22.4 -0.05 -0.05 -0.06 23.8 22.4 21.9
    24.6 21.4 21.4 -0.04 -0.06 -0.06
    
    

    Table 4 describes the format and contents of the ASCII data file nine.dat (File 5) distributed with this numeric data package. The missing-value indicators in this file are -9.9 for variables WBWC, WMWC, WUWC, ABWC, AMWC, AUWC, DBWC, DMWC, and DUWC; and -9.999 for variables WBWP, WMWP, WUWP, ABWP, AMWP, AUWP, DBWP, DMWP, and DUWP.

    First two data records:

     1993  14   14 26.5 25.9 24.4 26.2 24.6 25.4 24.2 25.5 24.7 -0.037 -0.039
    -0.043 -0.037 -0.045 -0.036 -0.044 -0.038 -0.039
     1993  55   55 27.1 26.7 26.5 26.7 24.5 25.4 24.9 25.6 25.1 -0.035 -0.035
    -0.033 -0.035 -0.045 -0.036 -0.040 -0.037 -0.037
    
    

    Last two data records:

     2000 306 2862  8.1 -9.9  5.0 -9.9 -9.9 -9.9  6.2 -9.9  4.9 -1.162 -9.999
    -3.641 -9.999 -9.999 -9.999 -2.104 -9.999 -3.632
     2000 350 2906 24.7 22.1 22.3 24.3 23.1 22.9 20.6 22.0 19.9 -0.046 -0.063
    -0.058 -0.047 -0.054 -0.050 -0.073 -0.060 -0.077
    
    

    Table 5 describes the format and contents of the ASCII data file tdr.dat (File 6) distributed with this numeric data package. The missing-value indicator in this file is -9.9 for variable SWC.

    First two data records:

     1993  14 35W B   1  1  0   0 17.8
     1993  14 35W B   1  2  0   8 26.6
    
    

    Last two data records:

     2000 350 70D U  10 30 72 232 22.0
     2000 350 70D U  10 31 72 240 22.7
    
    

    Table 6 describes the format and contents of the ASCII data file rocks.dat (File 7) distributed with this numeric data package. The missing-value indicators in this file are -999 for variables CFMASS30 and CFMASS60, -99.9 for variables CFVOL30 and CFVOL60, and -9.9 for variables CFPCT30 and CFPCT60.

    First two data records:

    W B   2  1 -999 -99.9 -9.9 -999 -99.9 -9.9
    W B   2  2  475 206.5  8.5  697 303.0 12.5
    
    

    Last two data records:

    D U  10 30  651 283.0 11.6  734 319.1 13.1
    D U  10 31 -999 -99.9 -9.9 -999 -99.9 -9.9
    
    

    Table 7 describes the format and contents of the ASCII data file littert.dat (File 8) distributed with this numeric data package. The missing-value indicator in this file is -9.9 for variable LITTERT.

    First two data records:

     1997  21  21.66 A  12.2
     1997  21  21.70 A   9.9
    
    

    Last two data records:

     2000 349 349.50 D   6.9
     2000 349 349.54 D   7.4
    
    

    Table 8 describes the format and contents of the ASCII data file st9398.dat (File 9) distributed with this numeric data package. The missing-value indicators in this file are -99.9 for variables ST10 and ST35.

    First two data records:

     1993  1   1   1.00    1   7.0   7.0
     1993  1   1   1.04    2   7.0   7.0
    
    

    Last two data records: >pre> 1998 12 366 366.92 8783 -99.9 -99.9 1998 12 366 366.96 8784 -99.9 -99.9

    Table 9 describes the format and contents of the ASCII data file st9900.dat (File 10) distributed with this numeric data package. The missing-value indicators in this file are -9.999 for variables ST10 and ST27, and -9.99 for variables STW6, STW31, STW55, STW72, STA7, STA32, STA59, STA100, STD9, STD30, STD45, and STD63.

    First two data records:

     1999  1   1   1.00    1  6.1571  7.4550 -9.99 -9.99 -9.99 -9.99 -9.99 -9.99 -
    9.99 -9.99 -9.99 -9.99 -9.99 -9.99
     1999  1   1   1.04    2  6.0109  7.3718 -9.99 -9.99 -9.99 -9.99 -9.99 -9.99 -
    9.99 -9.99 -9.99 -9.99 -9.99 -9.99
    

    Last two data records:

     2000 12 366 366.92 8783 -9.9999 -9.9999  3.10  5.50  6.90  7.40  4.20  7.00
    8.20  9.70  3.90  5.80  6.80  7.60
     2000 12 366 366.96 8784 -9.9999 -9.9999  3.00  5.50  6.90  7.40  4.10  7.00
    8.20  9.70  3.80  5.80  6.80  7.60
    
    

    Table 10 describes the format and contents of the ASCII data file mweather.dat (File 11) distributed with this numeric data package. The missing-value indicator in this file is -9.99 for variable WIND.

    First two data records:

     1993  1  384 186 101  -3.3  5.5 16.5 21.5 76.8 101.5  5.0  6.1  7.5 -9.99
     1993  2  488 241  50 -11.7  3.8 20.0 16.5 67.9 101.6  6.0  7.8  9.5 -9.99
    
    

    Last two data records:

     2000 11  439 232 104  -6.5  8.0 25.1 15.0 68.4 100.0  6.7 12.2 17.8  1.40
     2000 12  376 189  75 -12.4 -0.5 11.5 31.7 71.2  99.8  3.2  6.7 10.0  1.60
    
    

    Table 11 describes the format and contents of the ASCII data file dweather.dat (File 12) distributed with this numeric data package. The missing-value indicator in this file is -9.9 for variable WIND.

    First two data records:

     1993   1  8.04  3.61   66.8359   1.0   1.6   4.8  9.7  65.2  74.9  84.3  6.9
    6.9  7.0 -9.9
     1993   2  8.04  3.61   66.8359   0.0   1.6   4.9  9.7  65.2  75.0  84.3  6.7
    6.8  6.9 -9.9
    
    

    Last two data records:

     2000 365  8.90  4.70   57.0000   0.0 -10.5  -8.2 -6.3  63.0  71.1  83.3  3.7
    4.0  4.7  2.1
     2000 366 14.30  7.60   85.0000   0.0  -8.7  -6.3 -3.3  57.3  72.6  85.4  3.2
    3.6  3.9  1.4
    
    

    Table 12 describes the format and contents of the ASCII data files hw9399.dat (File 13) and hw00.dat (File 14) distributed with this numeric data package.

    The missing-value indicators in file hw9399.dat are -99 for variables QUAN, UQUAN, and SWISIS; -9.9 for variables WIND and ST; -99.9 for variable AT; and -9.999 for variable VPD.

    First two data records in file hw9399.dat:

     1993  1   1   1.00    0    0    0  -99   2.6  71.2  0.0 -9.9  7.0  0.213  -99
     1993  1   1   1.04    1    0    0  -99   2.4  71.8  0.0  2.6  7.0  0.206  -99
    
    

    Last two data records in file hw9399.dat:

     1999 12 365 365.96 8759    0    0    0  11.2  65.9  0.0  2.5  9.7  0.454    0
     1999 12 365 366.00 8760    0    0    0  11.4  64.6  0.0  2.5  9.8  0.454    0
    
    

    There are no missing values in file hw00.dat.

    First two data records in file hw00.dat:

     2000  1   1   1.04    1    0    0    0  11.1  66.1  0.0  2.3  9.4  0.449    0
     2000  1   1   1.08    2    0    0    0  10.4  69.0  0.0  2.1  9.3  0.392    0
    
    

    Last two data records in file hw00.dat:

     2000 12 366 366.96 8783    0    0    0  -5.6  70.3  0.0  1.6  3.6  0.120    0
     2000 12 366 367.00 8784    0    0    0  -5.9  73.8  0.0  1.7  3.6  0.104    0
    
    

    Table 13 describes the format and contents of the ASCII data file comptree.dat (File 15) distributed with this numeric data package. Trees that died during the experiment are represented as missing in the years after death occurred. Trees that reached (or approached) the 10 cm dbh cutoff during the experiment are represented as missing until the year they attained tree status. The missing-value indicator in this file is -99.9 for variables D010693, D010694, D011294, D010695, D010796, D010797, D010998, D011299, and D290101.

    First two data records:

       30.0AR      W U   8  2 61.6  11.9 -99.9 -99.9   9.9   9.9  10.9  11.4  12.1
    12.7  13.5
       32.0AR      A B   2 16 15.1 122.5 -99.9 -99.9  10.4  10.4  11.5  12.3  12.9
    13.1  13.7
    
    

    Last two data records:

     6019.0CF      D B   1 24  2.5 189.6 -99.9 -99.9 -99.9 -99.9   9.8  10.1  11.3
    10.3  10.4
     6020.0OA      D B   1 23  0.8 182.4 -99.9 -99.9 -99.9 -99.9  12.1  12.2  12.5
    12.8  12.9
    
    

    Table 14 describes the format and contents of the ASCII data file compsap.dat (File 16) distributed with this numeric data package. The missing-value indicators in this file are -9.99 for variables D1996, D1997, D1998, and D1999.

    First two data records:

       1.0AR       W U  9  2  1  2.12  2.32 -9.99 -9.99
       2.0AR       W U  9  2  2  2.96  2.95 -9.99 -9.99
    >
    

    Last two data records:

     597.0QV       D B  3 27 13  4.17  4.18  4.40  4.44
     598.0Carya    D B  3 27 14  1.52  1.50  1.60  1.61
    
    

    Table 15 describes the format and contents of the ASCII data file atree.dat (File 17) distributed with this numeric data package. The missing-value indicator in this file is -9999 for variable GROWTH.

    First two data records:

     1993   51AR A M   5 12  2673
     1993   52AR A M   5 12  2462
    
    

    Last two data records:

     2000 2992QA A M   6 13  1576
     2000 2996QP W M   5  9  2157
    
    

    Table 16 describes the format and contents of the ASCII data file asapling.dat (File 18) distributed with this numeric data package. The missing-value indicator in this file is -9.999 for variable GROWTH.

    First two data records:

    1994 3001   AR W U  10  1  0.122
    1994 3002   AR A U  10 11  0.090
    
    

    Last two data records:

    2000 4027a  CF A M   6 14 -9.999
    2000 5015a  CF W B   3  8 -9.999
    
    

    Table 17 describes the format and contents of the ASCII data file rellai.dat (File 19) distributed with this numeric data package. The missing-value indicator in this file is - 9.99 for variable RELLAI.

    First two data records:

     1992  85 -9.99
     1992  86 -9.99
    
    

    Last two data records:

     2000 349 -9.99
     2000 350 -9.99
    
    

    SAS ond Fortran Codes to Access the Data

    The following is SASTM code to read file sw.dat:

    /*** retrieval routine to read sw.dat ***/
    
    data sw ;
    
    infile '/home/cdp/ndp078a/sw.dat' ;
    input DATE $ 1-18 RDOY 19-23 DOY 24-27 W35WC 28-32 A35WC 33-37 D35WC 38-42
          W35WP 43-48 A35WP 49-54 D35WP 55-60 W70WC 61-65 A70WC 66-70 D70WC 71-75
          W3570WC 76-80 A3570WC 81-85 D3570WC 86-90 W3570WP 91-96 A3570WP 97-102
          D3570WP 103-108 ;
    
    run ;
    
    

    The following is Fortran code to read file sw.dat:

    C *** Fortran program to read the NDP-078a file "sw.dat"
    C
          INTEGER RDOY, DOY
          REAL W35WC, A35WC, D35WC, W35WP, A35WP, D35WP, W70WC,
         +     A70WC, D70WC, W3570WC, A3570WC, D3570WC, W3570WP,
         +     A3570WP, D3570WP
          CHARACTER DATE*18
    C
          OPEN (UNIT=1, FILE='sw.dat')
    C
       10 READ (1,100,END=99) DATE, RDOY, DOY, W35WC, A35WC, D35WC,
         + W35WP, A35WP, D35WP, W70WD, A70WC, D70WC, W3570WC, A3570WC,
         + D3570WC, W3570WP, A3570WP, D3570WP
      100 FORMAT (A18,I5,I4,3F5.1,3F6.2,6F5.1,3F6.2)
    C
          GO TO 10
       99 CLOSE (UNIT=1)
          STOP
          END
    
    

    The following is SASTM code to read file nine.dat:

    /*** retrieval routine to read nine.dat ***/
    
    data nine ;
    
    infile '/home/cdp/ndp078a/nine.dat' ;
    input YEAR 1-5 DOY 6-9 RDOY 10-14 WBWC 15-19 WMWC 20-24 WUWC 25-29
          ABWC 30-34 AMWC 35-39 AUWC 40-44 DBWC 45-49 DMWC 50-54 DUWC 55-59
          WBWP 60-66 WMWP 67-73 WUWP 74-80 ABWP 81-87 AMWP 88-94
          AUWP 95-101 DBWP 102-108 DMWP 109-115 DUWP 116-122 ;
    
    run ;
    
    

    The following is Fortran code to read file nine.dat:

    C *** Fortran program to read the NDP-078a file "nine.dat"
    C
          INTEGER YEAR, DOY, RDOY
          REAL WBWC, WMWC, WUWC, ABWC, AUWC, DBWC, DMWC, DUWC,
         +     WBWP, WMWP, WUWP, ABWP, AMWP, AUWP, DBWP, EMWP,
         +     DUWP
    C
          OPEN (UNIT=1, FILE='nine.dat')
    C
       10 READ (1,100,END=99) YEAR, DOY, RDOY, WBWC, WMWC, WUWC,
         + ABWC, AMWC, AUWC, DBWC, DMWC, DUWC, WBWP, WMWP, WUWP,
         + ABWP, AMWP, AUWP, DBWP, DMWP, DUWP
      100 FORMAT (I5,I4,I5,9F5.1,9F7.3)
    C
          GO TO 10
       99 CLOSE (UNIT=1)
          STOP
          END
    
    

    The following is SASTM code to read file tdr.dat:

    /*** retrieval routine to read tdr.dat ***/
    
    data tdr ;
    
    infile '/home/cdp/ndp078a/tdr.dat' ;
    input YEAR 1-5 DOY 6-9 DEPTH 10-12 TREAT $ 13-14 SLOPE $ 15-16 Y 17-19
          × 20-22 YM 23-25 XM 26-29 SWC 30-34 ;
    
    run ;
    
    

    The following is Fortran code to read file tdr.dat:

    C *** Fortran program to read the NDP-078a file "tdr.dat"
    C
          INTEGER YEAR, DOY, DEPTH, Y, X, YM, XM
          REAL SWC
          CHARACTER TREAT*2, SLOPE*2
    C
          OPEN (UNIT=1, FILE='tdr.test')
    C
       10 READ (1,100,END=99) YEAR, DOY, DEPTH, TREAT, SLOPE,
         + Y, X, YM, XM, SWC
      100 FORMAT (I5,I4,I3,2A2,3I3,I4,F5.1)
    C
          GO TO 10
       99 CLOSE (UNIT=1)
          STOP
          END
    
    

    The following is SASTM code to read file rocks.dat:

    /*** retrieval routine to read rocks.dat ***/
    
    data rocks ;
    
    infile '/home/cdp/ndp078a/rocks.dat' ;
    input TREAT $ 1-2 SLOPE $ 3-4 Y 5-7 × 8-10
          CFMASS30 11-15 CFVOL30 16-21 CFPCT30 22-26
          CFMASS60 27-31 CFVOL60 32-37 CFPCT60 38-42 ;
    
    run ;
    
    

    The following is Fortran code to read file rocks.dat:

    C *** Fortran program to read the NDP-078a file "rocks.dat"
    C
          INTEGER Y, X, CFMASS30, CFMASS60
          REAL CFVOL30, CFPCT30, CFVOL60, CFPCT60
          CHARACTER TREAT*2, SLOPE*2
    C
          OPEN (UNIT=1, FILE='rocks.dat')
    C
       10 READ (1,100,END=99) TREAT, SLOPE, Y, X, CFMASS30,
         + CFVOL30, CFPCT30, CFMASS60, CFVOL60, CFPCT60
      100 FORMAT (2A2,2I3,2(I5,F6.1,F5.1))
    C
          GO TO 10
       99 CLOSE (UNIT=1)
          STOP
          END
    
    

    The following is SASTM code to read file littert.dat:

    /*** retrieval routine to read littert.dat ***/
    
    data littert ;
    
    infile '/home/cdp/ndp078a/littert.dat' ;
    input YEAR 1-5 DOY 6-9 DFOY 10-16 TREAT $ 17-18 LITTERT 19-24  ;
    
    run ;
    
    

    The following is Fortran code to read file littert.dat:

    C *** Fortran program to read the NDP-078a file "littert.dat"
    C
          INTEGER YEAR, DOY
          REAL DFOY
          CHARACTER TREAT*2
    C
          OPEN (UNIT=1, FILE='littert.dat')
    C
       10 READ (1,100,END=99) YEAR, DOY, DFOY, TREAT, LITTERT
      100 FORMAT (I5,I4,F7.2,A2,F6.1)
    C
          GO TO 10
       99 CLOSE (UNIT=1)
          STOP
          END
    
    

    The following is SASTM code to read file st9398.dat:

    *** retrieval routine to read st9398.dat ***/
    
    data st9398 ;
    
    infile '/home/cdp/ndp078a/st9398.dat' ;
    input YEAR 1-5 MOY 6-8 DOY 9-12 DFOY 13-19 HOY 20-24
          ST10 25-30 ST35 31-36  ;
    
    run ;
    
    

    The following is Fortran code to read file st9398.dat:

    C *** Fortran program to read the NDP-078a file "st9398.dat"
    C
          INTEGER YEAR, MOY, DOY, HOY
          REAL DFOY, ST10, ST35
    C
          OPEN (UNIT=1, FILE='st9398.dat')
    C
       10 READ (1,100,END=99) YEAR, MOY, DOY, DFOY, HOY, ST10, ST35
      100 FORMAT (I5,I3,I4,F7.2,I5,2F6.1)
    C
          GO TO 10
       99 CLOSE (UNIT=1)
          STOP
          END
    
    

    The following is SASTM code to read file st9900.dat:

    /*** retrieval routine to read st9900.dat ***/
    
    data st9900 ;
    
    infile '/home/cdp/ndp078a/st9900.dat' ;
    input YEAR 1-5 MOY 6-8 DOY 9-12 DFOY 13-19 HOY 20-24
          ST10 25-32 ST27 33-40 STW6 41-46 STW31 47-52
          STW55 53-58 STW72 59-64 STA7 65-70 STA32 71-76
          STA59 77-82 STA100 83-88 STD9 89-94 STD30 95-100
          STD45 101-106 STD63 107-112 ;
    
    run ;
    
    

    The following is Fortran code to read file st9900.dat:

    C *** Fortran program to read the NDP-078a file "st9900.dat"
    C
          INTEGER YEAR, MOY, DOY, HOY
          REAL DFOY, ST10, ST27, STW6, STW31, STW55, STW72,
         + STA7, STA32, STA59, STA100, STD9, STD30, STD45, STD63
    C
          OPEN (UNIT=1, FILE='st9900.dat')
    C
       10 READ (1,100,END=99) YEAR, MOY, DOY, DFOY, HOY, ST10, ST27,
         + STW6, STW31, STW55, STW72, STA7, STA32, STA59, STA100,
         + STD9, STD30, STD45, STD63
      100 FORMAT (I5,I3,I4,F7.2,I5,2F8.4,12F6.2)
    C
          GO TO 10
       99 CLOSE (UNIT=1)
          STOP
          END
    
    

    The following is SASTM code to read file mweather.dat:

    /*** retrieval routine to read mweather.dat ***/
    
    data mweather ;
    
    infile '/home/cdp/ndp078a/mweather.dat' ;
    input YEAR 1-5 MONTH 6-8 QUAN 9-13 PYRAN 14-17 RAIN 18-21
          ATMIN 22-27 ATMEAN 28-32 ATMAX 33-37 RHMIN 38-42
          RHMEAN 43-47 RHMAX 48-53 STMIN 54-58 STMEAN 59-63
          STMAX 64-68 WIND 69-74;
    
    run ;
    
    

    The following is Fortran code to read file mweather.dat:

    C *** Fortran program to read the NDP-078a file "mweather.dat"
    C
          INTEGER YEAR, MONTH, QUAN, PYRAN, RAIN
          REAL ATMIN, ATMEAN, ATMAX, RHMIN, RHMEAN, RHMAX,
         + STMIN, STMEAN, STMAX, WIND
    C
          OPEN (UNIT=1, FILE='mweather.dat')
    C
       10 READ (1,100,END=99) YEAR, MONTH, QUAN, PYRAN, RAIN,
         + ATMIN, ATMEAN, ATMAX, RHMIN, RHMEAN, RHMAX, STMIN,
         + STMEAN, STMAX, WIND
      100 FORMAT (I5,I3,I5,2I4,F6.1,4F5.1,F6.1,3F5.1,F6.2)
    C
          GO TO 10
       99 CLOSE (UNIT=1)
          STOP
          END
    
    

    The following is SASTM code to read file dweather.dat:

    /*** retrieval routine to read dweather.dat ***/
    
    data dweather ;
    
    infile '/home/cdp/ndp078a/dweather.dat' ;
    input YEAR 1-5 DOY 6-9 QUAN 10-15 PYRAN 16-21 RADMEAN 22-31
          RAIN 32-37 ATMIN 38-43 ATMEAN 44-49 ATMAX 50-54 RHMIN 55-60
          RHMEAN 61-66 RHMAX 67-72 STMIN 73-77 STMEAN 78-82
          STMAX 83-87 WIND 88-92 ;
    
    run ;
    
    

    The following is Fortran code to read file dweather.dat:

    C *** Fortran program to read the NDP-078a file "dweather.dat"
    C
          INTEGER YEAR, DOY, RAIN
          REAL QUAN, PYRAN, RADMEAN, ATMIN, ATMEAN, ATMAX, RHMIN,
         + RHMEAN, RHMAX, STMIN, STMEAN, STMAX, WIND
    C
          OPEN (UNIT=1, FILE='dweather.dat')
    C
       10 READ (1,100,END=99) YEAR, DOY, QUAN, PYRAN, RADMEAN,
         + RAIN, ATMIN, ATMEAN, ATMAX, RHMIN, RHMEAN, RHMAX, STMIN,
         + STMEAN, STMAX, WIND
      100 FORMAT (I5,I4,2F6.2,F10.4,3F6.1,F5.1,3F6.1,4F5.1)
    C
          GO TO 10
       99 CLOSE (UNIT=1)
          STOP
          END
    
    

    The following is SASTM code to read file hw9399.dat:

    /*** retrieval routine to read hw9399.dat ***/
    
    data  hw9399 ;
    
    infile '/home/cdp/ndp078a/hw9399.dat' ;
    input YEAR 1-5 MOY 6-8 DOY 9-12 DFOY 13-19 HOY 20-24
          QUAN 25-29 PYRAN 30-34 UQUAN 35-39 AT 40-45
          RH 46-51 RAIN 52-56 WIND 57-61 ST 62-66
          VPD 67-73 SWISIS 74-78;
    
    run ;
    
    

    The following is Fortran code to read file hw9399.dat:

    C *** Fortran program to read the NDP-078a file "hw9399.dat"
    C
          INTEGER YEAR, MOY, DOY, HOY, QUAN, PYRAN, UQUAN, SWISIS
          REAL DFOY, AT, RH, RAIN, WIND, ST, VPD
    C
          OPEN (UNIT=1, FILE='hw9399.dat')
    C
       10 READ (1,100,END=99) YEAR, MOY, DOY, DFOY, HOY, QUAN,
         + PYRAN, UQUAN, AT, RH, RAIN, WIND, ST, VPD, SWISIS
      100 FORMAT (I5,I3,I4,F7.2,4I5,2F6.1,3F5.1,F7.3,I5)
    C
          GO TO 10
       99 CLOSE (UNIT=1)
          STOP
          END
    
    

    The following is SASTM code to read file hw00.dat:

    /*** retrieval routine to read hw00.dat ***/
    
    data  hw00 ;
    
    infile '/home/cdp/ndp078a/hw00.dat' ;
    input YEAR 1-5 MOY 6-8 DOY 9-12 DFOY 13-19 HOY 20-24
          QUAN 25-29 PYRAN 30-34 UQUAN 35-39 AT 40-45
          RH 46-51 RAIN 52-56 WIND 57-61 ST 62-66
          VPD 67-73 SWISIS 74-78;
    
    run ;
    
    

    The following is Fortran code to read file hw00.dat:

    C *** Fortran program to read the NDP-078a file "hw00.dat"
    C
          INTEGER YEAR, MOY, DOY, HOY, QUAN, PYRAN, UQUAN, SWISIS
          REAL DFOY, AT, RH, RAIN, WIND, ST, VPD
    C
          OPEN (UNIT=1, FILE='hw00.dat')
    C
       10 READ (1,100,END=99) YEAR, MOY, DOY, DFOY, HOY, QUAN,
         + PYRAN, UQUAN, AT, RH, RAIN, WIND, ST, VPD, SWISIS
      100 FORMAT (I5,I3,I4,F7.2,4I5,2F6.1,3F5.1,F7.3,I5)
    C
          GO TO 10
       99 CLOSE (UNIT=1)
          STOP
          END
    
    

    The following is SASTM code to read file comptree.dat:

    /*** retrieval routine to read comptree.dat ***/
    
    data  comptree ;
    
    infile '/home/cdp/ndp078a/comptree.dat' ;
    input ID 1-7 SPC $ 8-15 TREAT $ 16-17 SLOPE $ 18-19 Y 20-22 × 23-25
          YM 26-30 XM 31-36 D010693 37-42 D010694 43-48 D011294 49-54
          D010695 55-60 D010796 61-66 D010797 67-72 D010998 73-78
          D011299 79-84 D290101 85-90 ;
    
    run ;
    
    

    The following is Fortran code to read file comptree.dat:

    C *** Fortran program to read the NDP-078a file "comptree.dat"
    C
          INTEGER Y, X
          REAL ID, YM, XM, D010693, D010694, D011294, D010695,
         + D010796, D010797, D010998, D011299, D290101
          CHARACTER SPC*8, TREAT*2, SLOPE*2
    C
          OPEN (UNIT=1, FILE='comptree.dat')
    C
       10 READ (1,100,END=99) ID, SPC, TREAT, SLOPE, Y, X, YM,
         + XM, D010693, D010694, D011294, D010695, D010796,
         + D010797, D010998, D011299, D290101
      100 FORMAT (F7.1,A8,2A2,2I3,F5.1,10F6.1)
    C
          GO TO 10
       99 CLOSE (UNIT=1)
          STOP
          END
    
    

    The following is SASTM code to read file compsap.dat:

    /*** retrieval routine to read compsap.dat ***/
    
    data  compsap ;
    
    infile '/home/cdp/ndp078a/compsap.dat' ;
    input ORDER 1-6 SPC $ 7-15 TREAT $ 16-17 SLOPE $ 18-19 Y 20-21 × 22-24
          PLOTID 25-27 D1996 28-33 D1997 34-39 D1998 40-45 D1999 46-51 ;
    
    run ;
    
    

    The following is Fortran code to read file compsap.dat:

    C *** Fortran program to read the NDP-078a file "compsap.dat"
    C
          INTEGER ORDER, Y, X, PLOTID
          REAL D1996, D1997, D1998, D1999
          CHARACTER SPC*9, TREAT*2, SLOPE*2
    C
          OPEN (UNIT=1, FILE='compsap.dat')
    C
       10 READ (1,100,END=99) ORDER, SPC, TREAT, SLOPE, Y, X,
         + PLOTID, D1996, D1997, D1998, D1999
      100 FORMAT (F6.1,A9,2A2,I2,2I3,4F6.2)
    C
          GO TO 10
       99 CLOSE (UNIT=1)
          STOP
          END
    
    

    The following is SASTM code to read file atree.dat:

    /*** retrieval routine to read atree.dat ***/
    
    data  atree ;
    
    infile '/home/cdp/ndp078a/atree.dat' ;
    input YEAR 1-5 ID 6-10 SPC $ 11-13 TREAT $ 14-15 SLOPE $ 16-17 Y 18-20 × 21-23
          GROWTH 24-29 ;
    
    run ;
    
    

    The following is Fortran code to read file atree.dat:

    C *** Fortran program to read the NDP-078a file "atree.dat"
    C
          INTEGER YEAR, ID, Y, X, GROWTH
          CHARACTER SPC*3, TREAT*2, SLOPE*2
    C
          OPEN (UNIT=1, FILE='atree.dat')
    C
       10 READ (1,100,END=99) YEAR, ID, SPC, TREAT, SLOPE,
         + Y, X, GROWTH
      100 FORMAT (2I5,A3,2A2,2I3,I6)
    C
          GO TO 10
       99 CLOSE (UNIT=1)
          STOP
          END
    
    

    The following is SASTM code to read file asapling.dat:

    /*** retrieval routine to read asapling.dat ***/
    
    data  asapling ;
    
    infile '/home/cdp/ndp078a/asapling.dat' ;
    input YEAR 1-4 ID $5-12 SPC $ 13-15 TREAT $ 16-17 SLOPE $ 18-19 Y 20-22
          × 23-25 GROWTH 26-32 ;
    
    run ;
    
    

    The following is Fortran code to read file asapling.dat:

    C *** Fortran program to read the NDP-078a file "asapling.dat"
    C
          INTEGER YEAR, Y, X
          REAL GROWTH
          CHARACTER ID*7, SPC*3, TREAT*2, SLOPE*2
    C
          OPEN (UNIT=1, FILE='asapling.dat')
    C
       10 READ (1,100,END=99) YEAR, ID, SPC, TREAT, SLOPE,
         + Y, X, GROWTH
      100 FORMAT (I4,A8,A3,2A2,2I3,F7.3)
    C
          GO TO 10
       99 CLOSE (UNIT=1)
          STOP
          END
    
    

    The following is SASTM code to read file rellai.dat:

    /*** retrieval routine to read rellai.dat ***/
    
    data  rellai ;
    
    infile '/home/cdp/ndp078a/rellai.dat' ;
    input YEAR 1-5 DOY 6-9 RELLAI 10-15 ;
    
    run ;
    
    

    The following is Fortran code to read file rellai.dat:

    C *** Fortran program to read the NDP-078a file "rellai.dat"
    C
          INTEGER YEAR, DOY
          REAL RELLAI
    C
          OPEN (UNIT=1, FILE='rellai.dat')
    C
       10 READ (1,100,END=99) YEAR, DOY, RELLAI
      100 FORMAT (I5,I4,F6.2)
    C
          GO TO 10
       99 CLOSE (UNIT=1)
          STOP
          END
    
    
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